My Neighbor Just Died In Iraq

I think that the reason people were so upset by this cover was because they don't like it when their enemies are made to look like human beings.

I think that the reason people were so upset by this cover was because they don’t like it when their enemies are made to look like human beings.

The bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon ended the lives of three people. Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev walked through the crowded streets, set down their backpacks that were filled with home-made bombs (made of pressure cookers filled with ball-bearings, nails, and explosives from fireworks), and walked away from the devices that would soon take the lives of a 29 year-old restaurant manager named Krystle Marie Campbell, a 23 year-old Boston University graduate student named Lü Lingzi, and an eight year-old boy named Martin William Richard. In addition to the three people who died, the bombs sent destruction and shrapnel flying through the air and tearing through the flesh of hundreds of others. As is almost always the case when a bomb goes off, the number of people hurt by the blast is significantly more than the number of people who died—When the smoke cleared, 264 people were injured.

But what was also injured was our feeling of safety. Not just in Boston, but all over the country people had a feeling like the first time your apartment gets broken into in college, and you think to yourself, “I guess I’m not as safe as I thought I was.” So far this year, those were the only three people that have been killed inside of the United States by terrorist bombs.

Not very big....

Not very big….

Please take a moment to compare that with Iraq…. In Iraq, over 1000 people have been killed. Not so far this year–there were more than 1000 people killed by bombs LAST MONTH! All in a country that is smaller than the state of Texas. That means that if the ratio of killed to wounded were somewhere near what it was in the Boston bombing, there might be around 88,000 people who were injured in some way by bomb blasts in Iraq–maybe blowing out eardrums, maybe walking with a limp, maybe losing a limb or two–all in the month of July alone.

Imagine walking by something like this every day.

Imagine walking by something like this every day.

And these are people like you and me. They are people with families to take care of, and jobs that they don’t always love. People who hate the idea of someone setting off a bomb to make some sort of demented political or religious statement. People who are just living their lives, but now the new normal in their lives is news stories like one that closed down Boston for two days and had the rest of us glued to our TVs, except they see those stories EVERY DAY. Their new normal is being stopped at portable security stations and being patted down to look for bombs before you are allowed to enter places like malls or shopping centers.  Their new normal is going to work thinking, “I hope I don’t get blown up today,” and walking past the wreckage of recent explosions. Their new normal is knowing someone personally who has been affected by a bomb.

I love Boston as much as the Next guy....

I love Boston as much as the next guy….

I know a person who was in the city of Boston when the bombs went off, and I felt like that somehow gave me more of a connection to that tragedy. I would even tell people about it: “I have a friend who was IN BOSTON the bombs went off!” And people would genuinely be like, “Oh, wow.” And I’d shake my head, like “Yeah….” The more I think about this sort of thing, the more arbitrary it seems–Like if I felt more of a connection with and compassion for the people of Boston because Boston starts with B, and so does my last name….

Yay our team! Screw everyone else!!!

Yay our team! Screw everyone else!!!

I’m not really sure what my point is. It’s certainly not to suggest that the Boston bombing wasn’t horrific and tragic. It obviously was. Maybe it’s just to provide some perspective. Sometimes it seems like we only care about people on “our own team.” Lü Lingzi, the graduate student who died in the bombing, was a Chinese national. Imagine if her death was looked at as something less than the others because she was born in China. But there are news stories about explosions in Iraq every single day–20, 30, 50 people dying every day. And I’m starting to figure out why these stories aren’t affecting me like the stories of the three who died in Boston. It’s because I obviously don’t care.

And I think about the man standing before Jesus, asking him, “Who is my neighbor?”

May we look as much like Jesus as this burnt frying pan. I assume they were cooking bacon.... The most heavenly meat.

May we look as much like Jesus as this burnt frying pan. I assume they were cooking bacon…. The most heavenly meat.

I think that the Church looks the most like Jesus when it genuinely loves and cares about the people who don’t look or believe anything like we do–And not in the hopes of some sort of “conversion,” but just because we recognize that those people are our neighbors. Because the more we get to know God, the more we understand how God looks at folks who don’t look anything like us–He looks at them like they are his kids. And he loves them like his kids. And if we know God, we do too. God doesn’t care about borders or languages or ethnicity…. He cares about us. All of us. I don’t believe God wants the Church to convert Muslims (or anyone else) to Christianity–I believe he wants the Church to look like Jesus. And when our hearts break for people who live every day in fear of yet another bomb, we look like Jesus. When our hearts break for kids who have gotten used to the sound of drones flying through the air, we look like Jesus. When our hearts break for the girls who aren’t allowed to go to school in countries that we call our allies, we look like Jesus. And when we stand up and demand justice and religious freedom for our Muslim brothers and sisters right here in the United States, we look like Jesus.

So if you read the title of this post and found yourself caring about my neighbor’s death based solely on the assumption that he or she was from America, you might want to try looking at things differently. Try asking God to show you how much he loves the people in Iraq and Iran and Afghanistan and Syria and Egypt and Sudan. I believe he will. It probably sounds very foreign (pun intended) to many of you (this whole “loving your enemies” thing), but if the Church going to be worth anything to the world, it has to start really loving it. Our hearts break for those people in Boston, but may we be the kind of community whose heart breaks for suffering everywhere…. Not just suffering that slightly affects us and makes us feel less secure by inconveniently reminding us we are all going to die someday.

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4 Responses to My Neighbor Just Died In Iraq

  1. jono55 says:

    “I think that the Church looks the most like Jesus when it genuinely loves and cares about the people who don’t look or believe anything like we do–And not in the hopes of some sort of “conversion,” but just because we recognize that those people are our neighbors…. I don’t believe God wants the Church to convert Muslims (or anyone else) to Christianity–I believe he wants the Church to look like Jesus.”

    Oxymoron.

    can’t look like Jesus and NOT want to convert those who don’t know him.

    You just can’t get past passages like Luke 19:10.
    I think what you really don’t like is that us white protestants don’t include ourselves in that passage. we think “the lost” is “them… out there.” when in reality, it’s just as much “us” as it is “them” who are lost.

    • theboeskool says:

      Thanks so much for taking the time to read and respond, Jono. I don’t think it’s oxymoronic. I think Luke 19:10 fits about as well into my view as any verse you could have picked.

      So yeah, Luke 19:10 (for people who are reading and don’t feel like looking it up) has Jesus saying that “the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost.” This verse comes at the end of the story of Zacchaeus, when people were being critical of Jesus for hanging out with sinners. It is my understanding that Zacchaeus was a Jew, working for the Romans as a tax collector—one of the most hated roles a person could have. Jesus didn’t try to convert him. He just invited himself over to Zacchaeus’ house. It seems, from the story, that this action (reaching out to a social pariah) was enough to inspire him to give half his possessions to the poor and repay all the people he had cheated over the years X4…. And somehow, this reaction caused Jesus to say, “Salvation has come to him and his house today.” Jesus wasn’t walking around converting people…. He was just walking around. Being Jesus. Next thing you know, tax collectors are giving away half their stuff.

      Related to what you wrote—Another person asked me how I could reconcile this blog post with the Great Commission (Go out and make disciples of all nations) Here’s how: The 12 guys following Jesus around referred to him as “Teacher” or “Rabbi.” The word “Disciple” comes from the word meaning “Learner.” So these guys learned stuff from Jesus, and then he tells them to go out and make “learners” of everyone else. Or other followers of Jesus. To a lot of people, this idea has gotten warped into the idea that our biggest concern as followers of Jesus is to “convert” everyone from other religions to this different religion. As if this “Great Commission” as some people call it is now somehow more important than the greatest commandment (Love God with your everything) or the 2nd (Love your neighbor and yourself).

      When Jesus was asked who our neighbor was, he told a story of a Samaritan (a guy with a different religion, and probably the closest thing to a Muslim from the Bible) who was being way more loving to a person in need than the guys who followed all the laws of the religion. And then he said, “Go, and do likewise.” There was a long time where valuing one “Go” (make disciples) over another “Go” (do likewise) led to trying to “convert” people at the tip of a sword.

      Either Jesus is the truth, or he isn’t. If he is, than he’s bigger than just another religion. If he’s just another religion, I couldn’t care less about it.

      • jono55 says:

        So my first (and simplest response, before we even get into the rest…) is that Jesus didn’t just walk around. Jesus walked around while PREACHING the gospel of repentance from anything that wasn’t Him. IE: The way, The truth and The life.

        Illustrating C.S. Lewis’s “Lord, lunatic or liar” from the new testament is so simple that an 8th grader can do it.

        Your implications are correct about one thing. He was not at ALL selective about who he would piss off… didn’t matter if you were a pagan or a pharasee… only common factor was “follow me or I don’t know you”.

        Basically I discount any argument that starts with “Jesus wasn’t interested in converting anyone.”

        Conversion = “stop following who/what you’re currently following and instead follow me.”

        Like I said…. even an 8th grader can figure this out.

        SURELY I’ve misunderstood you, right?

  2. Pingback: A Christian Response To The Military Strike Against Syria | The Boeskool

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